True stories. Recreated

Stories from the inside

Stories From The Inside takes you into our organisation to find out what life is like for the Corrections staff working every day to make New Zealand safer.

Stories From The Inside takes you into our organisation to find out what life is like for the Corrections staff working every day to make New Zealand safer.

Is caring your calling?

Join our Nursing team

If caring is your calling join our nursing whānau and be a part of our holistic vision for healthcare.

If caring is your calling join our nursing whānau and be a part of our holistic vision for healthcare.

Supporting positive outcomes

Become a Psychologist

Assess and treat individuals who have complex needs in prison and in the community.

Assess and treat individuals who have complex needs in prison and in the community.

We're hiring now

We have vacancies across the motu in a range of careers.  Explore the current vacancies and start your journey with us today!

Explore our work

It takes a village to do what we do. Explore different areas of our work to learn more about the roles within Ara Poutama Aotearoa.

Custodial

In our custodial roles, you will be aiming to positively motivate and support people during a prison sentence, as well as ensure safety

Rehabilitation

Working with individuals, community organisations and whānau, our roles with a rehabilitation focus help people to make positive changes in their lives and address the root causes of offending.

Pae Ora (Health)

Working in an interdisciplinary team of health practitioners, we offer a range of services, including general health, psychology and mental health

Education, employment and trades

Our education, employment & trades focused roles help people in prison to gain skills, experience, and qualifications. Across a range of roles, their work spans from trades training to education and employment support.

Community and reintegration

Our community teams help to manage community-based sentences and orders. Usually this involves working directly with people on sentences or orders, as well as community organisations, and in some cases the wider justice system and whānau.

Supporting services

From programme designers to IT specialists, we have a range of corporate roles available, as well as opportunities to volunteer and intern.

Values

Our five values aren't just what we believe, they guide us in everything we say and do.

Wairua

We are unified and focused in our efforts.

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Wairua

We are unified and focused in our efforts.

  • We provide opportunities to enhance wellbeing, including mental wellbeing
  • We put the person at the centre of our focus, we listen to their voice and provide opportunities for them to talk and think about their situation, their future and how to get there.
  • We connect spiritually, physically and emotionally with whānau and communities in order to succeed.
  • We celebrate success.

Whānau

We develop supportive relationships.

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Whānau

We develop supportive relationships.

  • We proactively involve whānau/family, the wider community and other professionals and work collaboratively to achieve better outcomes.
  • Whanuangatanga (process to establish engagement and connections between people) is something we do inherently.
  • We engage with people to link them with their whānau and provide a community of support where all opinions are considered and respected.
  • We work as a team and share information to achieve better outcomes.

Manaaki

We care for and respect everyone.

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Manaaki

We care for and respect everyone.

  • We treat everyone in humane manner and with respect acknowledging their ethnicity, gender, sexuality and age.
  • We acknowledge and care about the people we work with.
  • We assess needs, target interventions and provide a constructive environment to develop people
  • We engage and communicate using positive language in order to work effectively with all people.
  • We promote personal responsibility and autonomy.

Kaitiaki

We are responsive and responsible.

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Kaitiaki

We are responsive and responsible.

  • We strive to keep everyone safe every day and take responsibility for our health and safety and for those around us.
  • We provide a safe and validating environment where everyone is supported to participate.
  • We are respectful towards human differences and responsive to individual needs and rights.
  • We consider the physical and emotional safety of those around us in every interaction.

Rangatira

We demonstrate leadership and are accountable.

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Rangatira

We demonstrate leadership and are accountable.

  • We provide opportunities for people to develop and have regular conversations.
  • We are transparent when we communicate and explain the rationale for our decisions.
  • We care about everyone's safety and wellbeing, and role model positive behaviour and lead by example.
  • We support people to perform their best and we hold ourselves to account.
  • We act with integrity in all we do.

Recent stories

values mobile

There are plenty of reasons to join our whānau. Meet some of the team here to learn their story.

Still learning 28 years on

After 28 years working at Corrections, Principal Corrections Officer Karl says that he’s still learning.

It's New Zealand Psychology Week

The week of 13-19 May, New Zealand recognises the incredible contribution made by psychologists to individuals, organisations, and communities across the motu.

Inclusive recruitment workshops

Inclusive recruitment practices are a key focus for Inclusion & Diversity and the Regional Recruitment team in the East Coast, Wellington and Taranaki, Whanganui & Manawatū Regions.

Recognising our librarians

As the guardians of access to books and knowledge, Corrections’ librarians open new worlds to people in prison in an often quiet, but positively powerful, way.

Top FAQ’s

What training do you offer new Corrections Officers?

  • Training

The Corrections Officer Development Pathway (CODP) is the initial training for new Corrections Officers and Offender Employment Instructors. The pathway starts with an induction week at your site, five weeks at our National Learning Centre in Upper Hutt and continues for a period of 12 months back at your prison site. The CODP includes classroom-based learning, self-led learning, practice in simulated environments and on-the-job learning.

 

There are four phases of the CODP programme:

Phase 1: One week

An induction week will take place at your home site. This allows you to familiarise yourself with your work environment and meet your team. This comprehensive induction will also cover safety and security, role and expectations of a Corrections Officer, access to systems, and your uniform. It’s likely there will be other new starters with you, so you won’t be on your own.

 

Phase 2: Five weeks

Ara Tika for Corrections officers is a two-day induction programme designed to give new staff an understanding of what Corrections does and how they play their part in reducing re-offending. You will join with other new staff from around the country beginning their careers with Corrections in a range of frontline roles. This programme is conducted at the National Learning Centre in Upper Hutt, Wellington.

 

New Corrections Officers continue their learning for a full five weeks at the National Learning Centre. This learning is focused on custodial practice, safety, and security. You will undertake a series of scenario-based assessments to assess your ability to perform the required practice areas effectively and your level of confidence in doing the job well. You will complete learning focused on managing prisoners and supporting their rehabilitation. Learners will also complete tactical options and control and restraint techniques.

 

Corrections will arrange and pay for travel, accommodation and food for any training that requires staff to be away from home.

 

Phase 3: Four weeks

You will be assisted by a learning buddy, practice leader or experienced staff from your unit, to carry out duties at your prison site. This phase continues for four weeks until you are signed off as competent to apply what you have learnt at the National Learning Centre. You will formally graduate as a Corrections Officer if you have completed your 10 weeks successfully.

 

Phase 4: Remaining 12 months

Over the remainder of the pathway, new Corrections Officers gain work experience that will enable them to complete the National Certificate level 3 for Offender Management.

 

We'll supply the dates for each phase in your offer letter, to allow you to plan ahead.

What hours do Corrections Officers work?

  • Corrections Officer FAQ's
  • Ask us anything videos

Full-time staff would work a combination of 8, 10, or 12 hour shifts and the roster patterns would depend on the operational requirements of the site.  

As we operate a 24/7 - 365 day service, you'll need to be available to work rostered hours including nights, weekends and public holidays.

What development opportunities are there as a Corrections Officer?

  • Corrections Officer FAQ's
  • Ask us anything videos

Corrections Officer

When you start with us you'll be paid a starting annual salary while you complete your training. This increases once you achieve Level 3 of the National Certificate in Offender Management, and again when you achieve Level 4.

As you develop experience, leadership skills, and demonstrate willingness to be a role model and coach other officers, you might consider applying to become a Senior Corrections Officer. 

 

Senior Corrections Officer

As a Senior Corrections Officer, part of your responsibility is supervising and supporting other Corrections Officers working on the same shift as you. You’ll be expected to lead, influence and mentor staff working with you. As you lead a shift you will have other responsibilities, making sure units and areas of the prison run smoothly.

 

Principal Corrections Officer

Once you’re a Senior Corrections Officer, you can then work towards applying to become a Principal Corrections Officer. In this role, you’re responsible for managing a prison unit and team of staff to ensure a safe and secure environment that allows prisoners to take part in their rehabilitation activities.   

Again, Principal Corrections Officers need to be good leaders and willing to coach others, but they also need to have really good decision-making skills and the ability to build up a strong team. 

 

Other specialist roles

For Corrections Officers with strong custodial skills, there are also opportunities for further development through working in more specialised areas. Opportunities include Drug Collection Officer roles, Site Intel officers, Drug Detection Teams/Dog Handlers, Site Emergency Response Teams, Site Prosecutors, Movement Co-Ordinators, Tactical Instructors, Prison Negotiators, Receiving office roles, working in mental health, and Advanced Control and Restraint teams (ACR).

Some of these roles (eg Prison Negotiators) are on an as-needed basis and are additional to your usual position, whereas others such as Dog Handling are full-time positions.

How safe are Custodial jobs?

  • Corrections Officer FAQ's

Safety is our number one priority, so the training is intensive and starts from day one. You’ll need to be ‘up for it’ as we put you through your paces to make sure you have what it takes to work face to face with our offenders. Like any job, there are risks - but you have a great team who have got your back, and we provide a wide range of training and equipment to keep you safe.

How fit do I need to be to become a Corrections Officer?

  • Corrections Officer FAQ's

During the recruitment process, you will need to carry out a Physical Readiness Assessment, which is based on tasks that you’ll carry out in your role as a Corrections Officer. You don't need to be a marathon runner or gym junkie to successfully complete it, but you will need to demonstrate a level of fitness for the role. 

The test includes: 

• Walking between units (a 300m speed walk)
• A simulated search- lifting and reaching
• A call to emergency - run five laps of a 20m course that includes stairs
• A control and restraint activity (grip and pull strength)
• Rescue of an unconscious person (50kg dummy moved 10m)

To pass, you need to complete the circuit within a certain amount of time.

Tips for interviews

  • Stages of the recruitment process

Interviews are a two-way process. They are an opportunity for you to find out more about us and the role you have applied for, while the we get the chance to find out more about you.

Instructor training pathway

  • Training

Instructors complete the same learning as Corrections Officers.

 

The Corrections Officer Development Pathway (CODP) is the initial training for new Corrections Officers and Offender Employment Instructors. The pathway starts with an induction week at your site, five weeks at our National Learning Centre in Upper Hutt and continues for a period of 12 months back at your prison site. The CODP includes classroom-based learning, self-led learning, practice in simulated environments and on-the-job learning.

 

There are four phases of the CODP programme:

 

Phase 1: One week

An induction week will take place at your home site. This allows you to familiarise yourself with your work environment and meet your team. This comprehensive induction will also cover safety and security, role and expectations of an Instructor, access to systems, and your uniform. It’s likely there will be other new starters with you, so you won’t be on your own.

 

Phase 2: Five weeks

Ara Tika for Instructors is a two-day induction programme designed to give new staff an understanding of what Corrections does and how they play their part in reducing re-offending. You will join with other new staff from around the country beginning their careers with Corrections in a range of frontline roles. This programme is conducted at the National Learning Centre in Upper Hutt, Wellington.

 

New Instructors continue their learning for a full five weeks at the National Learning Centre. This learning is focused on custodial practice, safety, and security. You will undertake a series of scenario-based assessments to assess your ability to perform the required practice areas effectively and your level of confidence in doing the job well. You will complete learning focused on managing prisoners and supporting their rehabilitation. Learners will also complete tactical options and control and restraint techniques.

 

Corrections will arrange and pay for travel, accommodation and food for any training that requires staff to be away from home.

 

Phase 3: Four weeks

You will be assisted by a learning buddy, practice leader or experienced staff from your unit, to carry out duties at your prison site. This phase continues for four weeks until you are signed off as competent to apply what you have learnt at the National Learning Centre. You will formally graduate as an Instructor if you have completed your 10 weeks successfully.

 

Phase 4: Remaining 12 months

Over the remainder of the pathway, new Instructors gain work experience that will enable them to complete the National Certificate level 3 for Offender Management.

 

We'll supply the dates for each phase in your offer letter, to allow you to plan ahead.

 

Pou Ārahi Iho - Case Management Training

  • Training

Case managers take part in Ara Tika, a week long induction programme designed to give new staff an understanding of what Corrections does and how they play their part in reducing re-offending. You will join with other new staff from around the country beginning their careers with Corrections in a range of frontline roles. The programme is conducted at the National Learning Centre in Upper Hutt, Wellington.

Pou Ārahi Iho follows on from Ara Tika and provides new case managers with the opportunity to complete their learning pathway at their work sites guided by learning and development facilitators. 

You will complete structured learning activities supported by your experienced colleagues. You will also be supported by your manager and practice leaders. 

Pou Ārahi Iho includes:

  • Principles underpinning our practice
  • Assessing those in our care (risk assessments)
  • Planning for those in our care (offender planning)
  • Transitioning those in our care (release planning)
  • Developing our practice (reflective practice)

Corrections will arrange and pay for travel, accommodation and food for any programmes that require staff to be away from home.

Pou Hapori Iho - Probation Officer training

  • Training

Pou Hapori Iho follows on from Ara Tika and provides new probation officers with the opportunity to complete their learning pathway at their work sites, guided by learning and development facilitators. 

You will complete structured learning activities supported by your experienced colleagues. You will also be supported by your manager and practice leaders. 

Pou Hapori Iho includes:

  • Principles underpinning our practice
  • Assessing people in the community (risk assessments)
  • Planning for people in the community (planning for interventions and programmes)
  • Working with people in the community (managing compliance)
  • Developing my practice (reflective practice)

Ara Tika is a week long programme designed to give new staff an understanding of what Corrections does and how they play their part in reducing re-offending in their new role. You will join with other new staff from around the country beginning their careers with Corrections in a range of frontline roles. The programme is conducted at the National Learning Centre in Upper Hutt, Wellington.

Corrections will arrange and pay for travel, accommodation and food for any programmes that require staff to be away from home.

Programme Facilitator Pathway

  • Training

Programme facilitators take part in Ara Tika, a week long induction programme designed to give new staff an understanding of what Corrections does and how they play their part in reducing re-offending. You will join with other new staff from around the country beginning their careers with Corrections in a range of frontline roles. The programme is conducted at the National Learning Centre in Upper Hutt, Wellington.

The Programme facilitators pathway follows on from Ara Tika and provides a full curriculum for new programme facilitators over a two year period.

The initial facilitator pathway is an intensive eight week learning programme, which includes three weeks in a classroom environment. Classroom-based courses are delivered in Wellington, Christchurch, Auckland or Hamilton. In between the classroom modules, structured activities and assignments are completed back at your local office so you begin to see and learn about the facilitator role.

The facilitator pathway includes:

  • Self-management (professional behaviour)
  • Facilitation of group learning
  • Planning delivery and reporting of Cognitive Behavioural Therapy (CBT) therapeutic programmes
  • Application of theoretical concepts
  • Working with Māori and Pacific values, concepts and processes
  • Co-facilitation and management of programme relationships and organisation.

Corrections will arrange and pay for travel, accommodation and food for any programmes that requires staff to be away from home.